Tree Guide

Not sure what variety of Christmas tree you want just yet? You’ve come to the right page. Use our filters and we’ll narrow down the best type of tree for you. Or, if you’re the thorough type, feel free to read about all 20 varieties of trees we’re featuring this year.

  • Fraser Fir

    Fraser Fir

    Fraser fir is native to high elevations of the Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina, Virginia and Tennessee. Fraser fir continues to increase in popularity for good reason. Fraser fir has blue-green needles with silvery undersides. The branches are stiff and hold up well to ornaments. The trees have a pleasant scent and needle retention is excellent. Fraser fir is widely available at all types of retail locations, typically east of the Rocky Mountains and at choose & cut farms in the mountains of North Carolina, the Virginias, the upper Great Lakes and the Northeast.

  • Noble Fir

    Noble Fir

    Noble fir is a stately Christmas tree featuring short, blue-green needles. Noble fir has stiff branches and an attractive form, making it a good tree for heavy ornaments.  It has among the best needle retention of all Christmas tree species, explaining its popularity as greenery for wreaths and garland, as well as Christmas trees. Grown in the Pacific Northwest, the Noble fir is one of the most popular species for Christmas trees and is widely available west of the Rocky Mountains and in many retail locations nationwide.

  • Douglas Fir

    Douglas Fir

    Douglas-fir has a long tradition as a Christmas tree in the United States and is one of the most popular Christmas tree species. Douglas-fir is a dense tree with soft, light green needles and a very pleasant Christmas tree aroma. Because the branches are not as stiff as some other species, the Douglas-fir is best decorated with light-weight ornaments. Douglas-fir is another good choice for budget-conscious consumers. This species is one of the most widely available Christmas tree species at all types of retail locations from east to west and north to south, as it is grown in all major Christmas tree producing states.

  • Balsam Fir

    Balsam Fir

    Balsam fir has been a traditional Christmas tree choice for generations.  Its popularity may be based on its strong Christmas tree scent; it is among the most fragrant of all species of Christmas trees.  Balsam fir has relatively short, dark green needles and excellent form making it a good choice for displaying ornaments. Typically grown in Canada, New England, the upper Great Lakes and Pennsylvania; Balsam fir can be found at choose and cut farms in these areas and is also frequently stocked at most types of retail locations east of the Rockies.

  • Nordmann Fir

    Nordmann Fir

    Nordmann fir is by far the most popular Christmas tree species in Europe and is quickly gaining in popularity in the US. Nordmann fir features glossy, dark green needles, which are darker than almost any other fir and has excellent needle retention.  The structure of Nordmann fir presents in a layered or tiered fashion with sturdy branches for displaying ornaments. Nordmann fir has very little or almost no fragrance.  Grown primarily in the Pacific Northwest, the Nordmann fir can readily be found in most all types of retail locations west of the Rockies, however it may also be found in limited numbers in some northern states in the eastern US.

  • Grand Fir

    Grand Fir

    Grand fir is an elegant tree with dense, glossy foliage. The needles of grand fir are very distinctive. They are long, dark green, and occur in a flattened arrangement in two well-defined rows: creating an almost feather-like appearance.  Grand fir is related to Concolor fir and maintains a characteristic fresh-cut scent.  Needle retention of Grand fir is best when displayed within two weeks of Christmas. Grown primarily in the Pacific Northwest, the Grand fir can readily be found in all types of retail locations west of the Rockies.  Grand fir may also be found in limited numbers in the Great Lakes region.

  • Scotch Pine

    Scotch Pine

    Scotch pine or Scots pine is among the first trees grown specifically for the Christmas tree market in the Midwest and is still a favorite for traditionalists. Scotch pines are dense trees with dark-green needles. Stiff branches hold up well to ornaments and needle retention is excellent. Scotch pine can be an economical choice and is found widely throughout the Midwest and at many retail locations east of the Rockies from the north to the south.

  • Canaan Fir

    Canaan Fir

    Canaan fir shares many of the characteristics of Balsam and Fraser fir and is actually a specific seed source of balsam fir from the Canaan Valley of West Virginia.  It features rich color, pleasant fragrance and an attractive layered structure that is ideal for displaying ornaments. Like Fraser fir, the needles of the Canaan fir are relatively short and soft. You will find Canaan fir at some retail locations east of the Rockies, and most often at choose & cut farms in its native West Virginia, as well as west and north to the Great Lakes states, Pennsylvania, and Ohio.

  • Colorado Blue Spruce

    Colorado Blue Spruce

    Colorado blue spruce remains a popular Christmas tree because of its lovely silver-blue color. Branches are stiff and hold heavy ornaments well. Blue spruce needles are quite sharp, so be sure to wear gloves and long-sleeves when handling. While the needles may make the tree hard to handle, some people choose blue spruce to keep pets away from the tree. A great tree for 2-3 weeks of display before needle retention is compromised. Consumers will find the Blue Spruce east of the Rockies and most frequently at retail locations in northern states.

  • White Pine

    White Pine

    Eastern white pine forms a dense tree with long, soft, green needles. Because of its softer branches, this tree will require light-weight ornaments. White pine foliage exhibits good needle retention and is often used for wreaths, roping, or other greenery. White pine is produced in the Midwest, Great Lakes, the Northeast, and the Appalachians and can be found at many retail locations east of the Rockies.

  • Black Hills Spruce

    Black Hills Spruce

    Black Hills spruce features grey-green needles that are shorter and softer than Colorado blue spruce. Black Hills spruce has excellent color and presents a very traditional Christmas tree appearance. Branches are stiff and hold up well to ornaments. A great tree for 2-3 weeks of display before needle retention is compromised. Consumers will find the Black Hills Spruce east of the Rockies and most frequently at retail locations in northern states.

  • Concolor Fir

    Concolor Fir

    Concolor fir (sometimes known as white fir) has a stately and symmetrical form and holds ornaments well. Needles are typically blue-green and, in some cases, can be a dramatic powder blue. The needles of concolor fir are longer than most other firs commonly grown for Christmas trees, giving trees a coarser appearance. Concolor needles have a unique and pleasant scent that is usually described as citrusy or orange-like. Consumers will find Concolor fir in most types of retail locations east of the Rockies.

  • Leyland Cypress

    Leyland Cypress

    Leyland Cypress is among the most popular Christmas trees in the south. The foliage is dark green-gray in color and has very little aroma. Its upright branches have a feathery appearance which call for lighter weight ornaments. Leyland cypress has a very attractive shape and full branching overall. Tree care is important and Leyland cypress requires more frequent attention to watering when brought into a warm home. Found almost exclusively in southern states, a choose and cut farm is the most likely place to find your perfect Leyland Cypress.

  • Korean Fir

    Korean Fir

    Korean fir is native to Asia, as noted by the name, but grows well in many regions of the U.S. It has a form similar to Fraser fir and is easily identified by dark green needles with striking silvery undersides. Strong branching and short, relatively soft needles are characteristic of the Korean fir.  The fragrance of the Korean fir is a bit different than more traditional species. A relative newcomer to the Christmas tree family, the Korean fir is most often found at Choose & Cut farms in the Great Lakes, Pennsylvania and surrounding areas, and may be found in a limited number of other retail locations.

  • Murray Cypress

    Murray Cypress

    Murray Cypress is much like the Leyland Cypress in appearance, however features foliage that is slightly darker green and somewhat stronger branches than the Leyland cypress. Murray cypress has a very attractive shape and full branching overall. This species has very little aroma. Tree care is important and Murray cypress requires more frequent attention to watering when brought into a warm home. Murray cypress is becoming a popular species on choose and cut farms in southern states.

  • Virginia Pine

    Virginia Pine

    Virginia pine has branches that are stout and woody to support heavier ornaments. It has a rich piney fragrance and good needle retention when watered regularly. The tree is small to medium in size and its foliage becomes extremely dense. Virginia pine continues to be one of the more popular Christmas trees in the south and can be found primarily in Southern states.

  • Arizona Cypress–Blue Ice

    Arizona Cypress–Blue Ice

    Blue Ice is a cultivar of Arizona cypress and has attractive blue-gray foliage and upright branches. Arizona Cypress foliage it not “needle-like” but flat and lacey; much like cedar. The Arizona cypress features a citrusy or minty fragrance. Typical of cypresses, Arizona cypress is subject to rapid drying in a warm home and consumers are encouraged to water regularly. Found almost exclusively in southern states, consumers will most likely find this blue beauty at a choose and cut farm.

  • Arizona Cypress–Carolina Sapphire

    Arizona Cypress–Carolina Sapphire

    Carolina Sapphire is a cultivar of Arizona cypress that features foliage that is blue to gray-blue in color and upright branches. Arizona Cypress foliage it not “needle-like” but flat and lacey; much like cedar. Some people describe the scent of Arizona cypress as citrusy or minty. Typical of cypresses, Arizona cypress is subject to rapid drying in a warm home and consumers are encouraged to water regularly. Grown almost exclusively in southern states, a choose and cut farm is the most likely place to find this southern favorite.

  • Turkish Fir

    Turkish Fir

    Turkish fir is a relatively new-comer and appears to be a promising species for the US Christmas tree market. Turkish fir is closely related to Nordmann fir and features similar attributes. It features deep green needles, a layered appearance to its branches and excellent needle retention.  Turkish fir is a good choice for displaying ornaments.  Because of its relative infancy in the market, Turkish fir will most likely be found at choose & cut farms or garden centers and seasonal lots in close proximity to the grower. Plantations of Turkish fir have been established in the Pacific Northwest, upper Great Lakes and Pennsylvania.

  • Monterey Pine

    Monterey Pine

    The Monterey pine is a popular Christmas tree in the southwest. The Monterey pine is very fragrant and has a structure that includes strong branches for ornaments. It features medium green needles that are approximately 4 to 5 inches long.  This Christmas tree is available almost exclusively on choose and cut Christmas tree farms in the Southwest and is not typically available at retail locations.